Google latitude not updating. Google resurrected a dead product on Wednesday and no one noticed.



Google latitude not updating

Google latitude not updating

But on Wednesday the company pulled off an impressive, and curious, feat: It wowed the public with an eight-year-old idea. Google unveiled a new set of features for its popular Maps app that lets users share their locations with friends and contacts in real time. Thanks to this update, Google Maps users will now be able to quickly let friends know if they're running late to a meeting or stuck in traffic.

It's a compelling idea. And if you're wondering why Google hadn't thought of this earlier, the answer is: In , when smartphones were still in their infancy, Google introduced something called Latitude. The Latitude app, to quote Google's blog post announcing it , "allows you to share your location with your friends and to see their approximate locations, if they choose to share them with you.

Take a look at the two side by side. Here is Google Latitude, circa Google And here is a screenshot of the new Google Maps location-sharing feature: Google The interfaces look almost identical, even though technology has changed dramatically in the past eight years.

The initial version of Google Latitude was for BlackBerry phones. Advertisement At the time Latitude was launched, the app drew widespread privacy concerns. Privacy International, a European watchdog group, published a report highlighting the risk that users might not be aware Latitude was enabled and could thus track their whereabouts.

A Google spokeswoman told Computerworld at the time that the company took user feedback about privacy seriously and was adding notifications to alert users when Latitude was turned on.

Hello again Eight years later, the privacy concerns haven't gone away, but by and large, the outcry has been a footnote to the story. Instead, most of the coverage has focused on the benefits of sharing locations — for example, allowing parents to keep track of their smartphone-toting children — not fear-mongering about how it could go wrong.

The world has changed since when Google first tried this. Two billion people are on Facebook's social network. Millions of people wear bracelets that record their physical activity. The new hot gadget du jour is an eavesdropping microphone-speaker device with an innocent name like Alexa that consumers voluntarily put in their kitchens to get quick weather updates and sports scores.

It's not the first time we've seen a once controversial tech product resurface in new packaging a few years later to a much warmer reception. Just look at how much cooler people think Snap's video-recording sunglasses are now, only a few years after Google Glass.

The Google Maps location-sharing comeback is a good reminder of how quickly technology moves and how fluid our seemingly deeply rooted societal norms might be. Advertisement More importantly, it's a good time to reflect and take stock of what we give up and what we gain every time we embrace the latest life-changing tech toys and services.

Get the latest Google stock price here.

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How To Get Addresss, Latitude and Longitude Using Marker position on Google Maps without refreshing



Google latitude not updating

But on Wednesday the company pulled off an impressive, and curious, feat: It wowed the public with an eight-year-old idea. Google unveiled a new set of features for its popular Maps app that lets users share their locations with friends and contacts in real time. Thanks to this update, Google Maps users will now be able to quickly let friends know if they're running late to a meeting or stuck in traffic.

It's a compelling idea. And if you're wondering why Google hadn't thought of this earlier, the answer is: In , when smartphones were still in their infancy, Google introduced something called Latitude. The Latitude app, to quote Google's blog post announcing it , "allows you to share your location with your friends and to see their approximate locations, if they choose to share them with you.

Take a look at the two side by side. Here is Google Latitude, circa Google And here is a screenshot of the new Google Maps location-sharing feature: Google The interfaces look almost identical, even though technology has changed dramatically in the past eight years. The initial version of Google Latitude was for BlackBerry phones. Advertisement At the time Latitude was launched, the app drew widespread privacy concerns.

Privacy International, a European watchdog group, published a report highlighting the risk that users might not be aware Latitude was enabled and could thus track their whereabouts. A Google spokeswoman told Computerworld at the time that the company took user feedback about privacy seriously and was adding notifications to alert users when Latitude was turned on. Hello again Eight years later, the privacy concerns haven't gone away, but by and large, the outcry has been a footnote to the story.

Instead, most of the coverage has focused on the benefits of sharing locations — for example, allowing parents to keep track of their smartphone-toting children — not fear-mongering about how it could go wrong. The world has changed since when Google first tried this. Two billion people are on Facebook's social network. Millions of people wear bracelets that record their physical activity. The new hot gadget du jour is an eavesdropping microphone-speaker device with an innocent name like Alexa that consumers voluntarily put in their kitchens to get quick weather updates and sports scores.

It's not the first time we've seen a once controversial tech product resurface in new packaging a few years later to a much warmer reception. Just look at how much cooler people think Snap's video-recording sunglasses are now, only a few years after Google Glass. The Google Maps location-sharing comeback is a good reminder of how quickly technology moves and how fluid our seemingly deeply rooted societal norms might be.

Advertisement More importantly, it's a good time to reflect and take stock of what we give up and what we gain every time we embrace the latest life-changing tech toys and services. Get the latest Google stock price here.

Google latitude not updating

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5 Comments

  1. On most platforms Latitude could continue to update the user's location in the background when the application was not in use, while on others it only updated the user's location when the application was in use.

  2. Two billion people are on Facebook's social network. Take a look at the two side by side. While many talked about the ease of use the new feature brought in, one subtle thing that went unnoticed was the resurrection of once-popular Google Latitude service.

  3. Location sharing has been a privacy nightmare for users. The world has changed since when Google first tried this. At the end of May , Google announced an API which allows applications to make use of Latitude data, with the user's explicit consent.

  4. In , when smartphones were still in their infancy, Google introduced something called Latitude. Google unveiled a new set of features for its popular Maps app that lets users share their locations with friends and contacts in real time. Google had also discontinued Google Latitude over the concerns of users privacy.

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