Richfaces progress bar not updating. Richfaces progress bar not updating.



Richfaces progress bar not updating

Richfaces progress bar not updating

The Start and Stop buttons below the progress bar are plain JSF buttons that control the bar through their onclick events see Listing 3. Notice that the button's type is set to button instead of the default, submit.

This is important, because you don't want the button to submit anything to the server; you merely want it to call a JavaScript function in the browser.

Listing 4 shows the JavaScript functions that start and stop the bar. Using the ProgressBar component in manual mode The manual progress bar on the page is very similar, as you can see in Listing 5. Notice that the manual bar's auto attribute is set to false, and it does not use either the timeInterval or proportion attributes that were set on the automatic bar. The buttons that control the manual progress bar are identical to the buttons used in Listing 5, previously, using the JavaScript code in Listing 6 to control the component: Then set the progress action by using the upDatePercentage call and specifying a new value.

The resetPB function uses zero, whereas, in the advancePB call, you first get the current state pb. After you have done this, you need to update the manual progress bar on the screen by using the redraw call. In the next section, you'll see more realistic examples. Using an automatic progress bar for a long-running, server-side task Open the auto. This page has a button that initiates a time-consuming action on the server. When the user clicks the button, the server waits 10 seconds before responding to the browser.

In a real-world application, the server may be busy querying a database, computing a route, or performing some similar task that takes a while to complete. Even though you don't know how long it will take the server to respond, you can let the user know that the task is running and that the user should wait.

One way to do so is to show an automatic progress bar that will run until the server responds and the page gets refreshed.

The button and the progress bar on this page see Listing 7 are very similar to those that you saw on the basic. It is also initially hidden by using the initHidden attribute and does not become visible until the user clicks the button. It uses the JavaScript function shown in Listing 9 to do so. Additionally, the button calls visible to make the progress bar visible to the user. This page demonstrates a ProgressBar component used in a pure client-side environment, without any interactions with the server.

Such a scenario can often be found on the pages that ask a user to perform a number of operations or steps, such as filling out a large form or taking a test.

As an example, the manual. As soon as one of the answers is modified, the progress bar is updated to reflect how many answers were correct and to show overall progress.

To build this page, you use a ProgressBar component in manual mode, similar to the one used on the basic. You can see the result in Figure 4. Manual mode after update View image at full size Monitoring progress of a server-side task by using Ajax In the earlier example auto.

Therefore, it was appropriate to use an automatic ProgressBar, and it just kept running until the server finished processing the task. For example, you could be processing a database row by row, and you know how many rows there are and how many have already been processed. In such a case, it would be useful if the progress bar in the browser could be updated according to the server-side status, rather than running blindly.

First, you need to add a ProgressBar component, using the code that you see in Listing This may not be obvious at first -- after all, you are not really going to update it manually every time.

However, because the progress is going to be set through a JavaScript function, manual mode is exactly what you need here. To have the server report the status of the running task, you create a hidden input field that holds the status current progress percentage , and you put this field into a panel that can be updated via Ajax.

Every time the browser sends an Ajax request to the server, the get method for the pbValue property will be executed and whatever value it returns will be put into the hidden input field in the browser. In the sample application, the get method for pbValue simply keeps a counter in the session and increments it every time the get method is called. There is also a Reset button on the page that resets the counter to zero.

The easiest way to send an Ajax request is to have a button that does that when the user clicks the button see Listing Therefore, you make the button invisible by setting the style attribute to display: To automatically kick off the Ajax refresh action, you will set up a JavaScript timer on the button Listing All the poll function does is simulate a click on the button.

That click sends the Ajax request to the server, the server returns current progress status, and the hidden field is updated.

This all happens without any user interaction. After you have the current progress updated in the hidden input field, all that's left to do is to update the ProgressBar component accordingly. If you noticed, the Ajax tag also has a JavaScript function associated with itm as Listing 17 shows. As soon as that happens, you take the value of the hidden input field and update the progress bar see Listing Figure 5 shows the effect on the user interface.

Main ProgressBar attributes Attribute.

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Richfaces progress bar not updating

The Start and Stop buttons below the progress bar are plain JSF buttons that control the bar through their onclick events see Listing 3. Notice that the button's type is set to button instead of the default, submit.

This is important, because you don't want the button to submit anything to the server; you merely want it to call a JavaScript function in the browser. Listing 4 shows the JavaScript functions that start and stop the bar. Using the ProgressBar component in manual mode The manual progress bar on the page is very similar, as you can see in Listing 5. Notice that the manual bar's auto attribute is set to false, and it does not use either the timeInterval or proportion attributes that were set on the automatic bar.

The buttons that control the manual progress bar are identical to the buttons used in Listing 5, previously, using the JavaScript code in Listing 6 to control the component: Then set the progress action by using the upDatePercentage call and specifying a new value. The resetPB function uses zero, whereas, in the advancePB call, you first get the current state pb.

After you have done this, you need to update the manual progress bar on the screen by using the redraw call. In the next section, you'll see more realistic examples.

Using an automatic progress bar for a long-running, server-side task Open the auto. This page has a button that initiates a time-consuming action on the server.

When the user clicks the button, the server waits 10 seconds before responding to the browser. In a real-world application, the server may be busy querying a database, computing a route, or performing some similar task that takes a while to complete. Even though you don't know how long it will take the server to respond, you can let the user know that the task is running and that the user should wait.

One way to do so is to show an automatic progress bar that will run until the server responds and the page gets refreshed. The button and the progress bar on this page see Listing 7 are very similar to those that you saw on the basic. It is also initially hidden by using the initHidden attribute and does not become visible until the user clicks the button. It uses the JavaScript function shown in Listing 9 to do so. Additionally, the button calls visible to make the progress bar visible to the user.

This page demonstrates a ProgressBar component used in a pure client-side environment, without any interactions with the server. Such a scenario can often be found on the pages that ask a user to perform a number of operations or steps, such as filling out a large form or taking a test. As an example, the manual. As soon as one of the answers is modified, the progress bar is updated to reflect how many answers were correct and to show overall progress.

To build this page, you use a ProgressBar component in manual mode, similar to the one used on the basic. You can see the result in Figure 4. Manual mode after update View image at full size Monitoring progress of a server-side task by using Ajax In the earlier example auto.

Therefore, it was appropriate to use an automatic ProgressBar, and it just kept running until the server finished processing the task. For example, you could be processing a database row by row, and you know how many rows there are and how many have already been processed. In such a case, it would be useful if the progress bar in the browser could be updated according to the server-side status, rather than running blindly.

First, you need to add a ProgressBar component, using the code that you see in Listing This may not be obvious at first -- after all, you are not really going to update it manually every time.

However, because the progress is going to be set through a JavaScript function, manual mode is exactly what you need here. To have the server report the status of the running task, you create a hidden input field that holds the status current progress percentage , and you put this field into a panel that can be updated via Ajax.

Every time the browser sends an Ajax request to the server, the get method for the pbValue property will be executed and whatever value it returns will be put into the hidden input field in the browser.

In the sample application, the get method for pbValue simply keeps a counter in the session and increments it every time the get method is called. There is also a Reset button on the page that resets the counter to zero. The easiest way to send an Ajax request is to have a button that does that when the user clicks the button see Listing Therefore, you make the button invisible by setting the style attribute to display: To automatically kick off the Ajax refresh action, you will set up a JavaScript timer on the button Listing All the poll function does is simulate a click on the button.

That click sends the Ajax request to the server, the server returns current progress status, and the hidden field is updated. This all happens without any user interaction. After you have the current progress updated in the hidden input field, all that's left to do is to update the ProgressBar component accordingly. If you noticed, the Ajax tag also has a JavaScript function associated with itm as Listing 17 shows.

As soon as that happens, you take the value of the hidden input field and update the progress bar see Listing Figure 5 shows the effect on the user interface. Main ProgressBar attributes Attribute.

Richfaces progress bar not updating

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