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Updating pickled kitchen cabinets

Updating pickled kitchen cabinets

Once pickled, your cabinets will have a light sheen of color, but the wood grain will still be visible. Depending on the color and method of the pickling job, it may look classic and timeless--or dated.

If your cabinets fall into the latter category, you can refinish them to change the color or simply to bring the wood back to its original finish. Refinished cabinets look new with a fresh coat of stain. Step 1 Spray the cabinets with ammonia-based cleaner and wipe them down with a rag to remove grease and grime. Step 2 Attach medium-grit sandpaper to an electric hand-held sander. Sand the cabinets, moving in the direction of the wood grain. Remove as much of the shiny topcoat that you can with the medium-grit paper.

Step 3 Switch the sandpaper to fine-grit paper. Sand the cabinets again, removing as much color as possible. The cabinets should be smooth and free of color when you have finished sanding. Step 4 Fold a piece of fine-grit sandpaper in half. Use the folded edge to sand the small crevices and difficult-to-reach portions of the cabinet.

Wipe the entire cabinet down with a damp rag to remove the sanding dust. Step 5 Apply stain to the cabinets with a quality paintbrush. Wipe away the excess stain with a clean rag. Allow the first coat of stain to soak into the wood. Apply a second coat in the same manner. Let the stain dry completely. Step 6 Dip a quality paintbrush into polyurethane. Apply a thin layer of the polyurethane topcoat to the cabinets.

Let the first coat dry to the touch before applying a second coat.

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DIY: Painting Oak Kitchen Cabinets White



Updating pickled kitchen cabinets

Once pickled, your cabinets will have a light sheen of color, but the wood grain will still be visible. Depending on the color and method of the pickling job, it may look classic and timeless--or dated.

If your cabinets fall into the latter category, you can refinish them to change the color or simply to bring the wood back to its original finish. Refinished cabinets look new with a fresh coat of stain. Step 1 Spray the cabinets with ammonia-based cleaner and wipe them down with a rag to remove grease and grime. Step 2 Attach medium-grit sandpaper to an electric hand-held sander. Sand the cabinets, moving in the direction of the wood grain. Remove as much of the shiny topcoat that you can with the medium-grit paper.

Step 3 Switch the sandpaper to fine-grit paper. Sand the cabinets again, removing as much color as possible. The cabinets should be smooth and free of color when you have finished sanding.

Step 4 Fold a piece of fine-grit sandpaper in half. Use the folded edge to sand the small crevices and difficult-to-reach portions of the cabinet.

Wipe the entire cabinet down with a damp rag to remove the sanding dust. Step 5 Apply stain to the cabinets with a quality paintbrush. Wipe away the excess stain with a clean rag. Allow the first coat of stain to soak into the wood. Apply a second coat in the same manner. Let the stain dry completely. Step 6 Dip a quality paintbrush into polyurethane. Apply a thin layer of the polyurethane topcoat to the cabinets. Let the first coat dry to the touch before applying a second coat.

Updating pickled kitchen cabinets

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5 Comments

  1. Therefore, after which, I spent the afternoon playing with it and finally decided on my color, Functional Gray. Copper is a beautiful complement to oak cabinets with its earthy rich metal finish.

  2. Depending on the color and method of the pickling job, it may look classic and timeless--or dated.

  3. Not a huge fan of the track lights either… And I promise, I will work on learning how to take big-girl, non-iPhone pictures someday: Therefore, after which, I spent the afternoon playing with it and finally decided on my color, Functional Gray.

  4. But not the mauve. And with real wood comes real potential. Prime for Bonding Bonding primers adhere to difficult surfaces and provide a surface to which paint can stick.

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